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20121108
20121108
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
've heard, seen perhaps more cyberattacks that are maybe something like an armed attack under the u.n. charter. conceivably i suppose even an act of war, though that is a debatable point as to whether we've seen anything like that to date. i have put a few terms of the things that are really. computer network attack, as we've been talking up, computer network exploitation is basically efforts to infiltrate a computer network for any other purpose i just described. so maybe some sort of armed attack. maybe it's for criminal activities and you're hoping to be surreptitious about what you can. maybe it's her espionage and then you're hoping to be surreptitious. cite a few examples of how these concepts and relate to one another. and how come if you are in the business of computer network defense, you are trying to defend networks at your company but if you're looking at this from a policy perspective for the united states, for example, how vulnerable is the united states, how vulnerable is our critical infrastructure and nuclear power plants, things like that. you quickly see that an inf
of mass destruction. and the moon landing was real. and fema is not building concentration camps. and un election observers are not taking over texas. and moderate reforms of the regulations on the insurance industry and the financial services industry in this country are not the same thing as communism. listen, last night was a good night for liberals and for democrats for very obvious reasons, but it was also, possibly, a good night for this country as a whole. because in this country, we have a two-party system in government. and the idea is supposed to be that the two sides, both come up with ways to confront and fix the real problems facing our country. they both propose possible solutions to our real problems. and we debate between those possible solutions. and by the process of debate, we pick the best idea. that competition between good ideas from both sides about real problems in the real country should result in our country having better choices, better options, than if only one side is really working on the hard stuff. and the if the republican party and the conservative movem
? they include senator john kerry or u.n. ambassador susan rice. of course, senator john kerry recently spent a lot of time with president obama. he helped him on debate preparations. another person who has been very vocal about wanting to leave if the president has a second term. treasury secretary timothy geithner. he's been the president's right hand man when it comes to the economy. he helped bring the economy back from the brink in 2009. possible replacements for geithner include the current chief of staff jack lou, who is widely respected within this administration but also within washington, d.c. another person who might potentially be leaving is defense secretary leon panetta. leon panetta is someone who might be ready to retire from what has been a long and distinguished career in politics. dates back to 1977 when he was in the house of representatives. possible replacements include his deputy secretary and also michelle flourney, the former undersecretary of defense. and then attorney general eric holder possibly leaving. possible replacements for him include homeland security secre
are talking about is who is going to replace hillary clinton. the two names who have voted is u.n. ambassador susan rice and john kerry. i have no problem with susan rice. i think she's fantastic and unfortunate how she's been treated recently. i tell you, john kerry during this campaign has been fantastic in his debate prep with the president. i thought his speech as the dp nc was brilliant, and i think he would be a terrific diplomat. there's concerns that if he was nominated then the senate -- his senate seat would be open and scott brown could have another shot at getting into the senate. i don't think that would be the worst thing in the world for the president, especially since we picked up seats this time around. scott brown, as a republican who may actually across the aisle, could actually serve as a useful political tool for the president. that will be interesting to watch. the other one, of course, is treasury secretary time geithner leaving. one of the outside names that's been floated is cheryl sandberg, coo of facebook. she's the first one and she's had a terrific choice. another
several examples of massive united nations lead interventions where the u.n. moved in and established a presence in iraq and afghanistan. it was u.s. and nato lead. in the middle east and north africa particularly in these countries we are discussing something new is happening. in some respects the international community learning to do things differently. we are not going back to what we have done in the last 20 years. we are going to do it in a different way and has an international community we are learning what that process is and if you are on the ground you can see it. a lot of people -- there's a hesitancy about this intervention and this involvement that is quite telling and wasn't there in the past. >> thank you. >> i would like to know -- i am abigail woodward and i would like to know how women's rights are being protected and advanced and i would like to know if the muslim brotherhood has seen this debate impediment to that and how the constitutions are including them. >> let's start with the most significant case, constitutional issues and the role of the muslim brotherhoo
? some say john kerry, some have speculated about susan rice, the embattled u.n. ambassador, stepping into hillary clinton's role. >> that sounds kind of farfetched, but who knows? anything's possible. certainly, the problem susan rice would have is because of what she said about the successful raid about islamist militants on the u.s. diplomatic outpost if benghazi being the fault of a youtube video, that was very bad for her. she would compound a problem that the departure of hillary clinton would help alleviate. state department's been really under close scrutiny because of the response to this. the lack of preparation for it, for the attack and the response thereafter, that's something they would like to get away from. putting susan rice in there would intensify it. megyn: last but not least, quickly, if geithner goes, i mean, that's an important job he has. and who is likely to fill that role, and how would it change americans', you know, day-to-day lives? >> well, what the president has in tim geithner's departure is an -- or assumed departure is an opportunity to send a message
international allies, partners, the guys we do business with at the u.n. -- where is everyone else prepared to be before we go forward? host: on russia, this is the "wall street journal." the defeat was a relief in russia because mitt romney had called moscow the number one political foe of the u.s. it was added that mr. vladimir putin sent a telegram to mr. obama that the kremlin said was secret until the u.s. revealed the contents. dmitry medvedev posted a "congratulations" on twitter. so that was from russia. another foreign policy issue is china. here is the "new york times." warm words from china with a subtext of warning. robust relationships with china while maintaining traditional military ties with the u.s. we do not want to be forced to choose between beijing and washington but what is going on here? guest: it has to be looked at in the context of the campaign that just ended. china emerged as a symbol -- for romney, obama's regas overseas, his inability to stand up to this rising asian power. the united states and china are so intertwined economically that is a very hard to start
. secretary of state hillary clinton will also transition out. u.n. ambassador susan rice was seen as likely replacement that could be in jeopardy given her public involvement in the very controversial benghazi situation. but also looking at that position, senator kerri. seen as potential contender for secretary of state slot, jenna. jenna: you mentioned burnout some of the personal reasons folks don't stay two terms. what are the key decisions that will impact the decisions? >> i mentioned fiscal cliff with that coming, issues about sequestration. defense secretary leon panetta has been very vocal about the fears of the impact on the pentagon. he has been very involved in the negotiations. we talked to a professor from to us son state university. she said when people are invested in the negotiations they don't like to walk away. that is probably true of secretary panetta. here is what she told us. >> defense secretary leon panetta, he has fought hard against sequestration because he didn't want to see the type of cuts that sequestration called for the defense department. and he is going to
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)